George V Shillings

1911
1911 Obv 11911 Obv 21911 Obv 3
  3 obverses
1912
1912 Rev A1912 Rev B
  2 reverses
1913
1913

1914
1914

1915
1915

1916
1916

1917
1917

1918
1918

1919
1919

1920
1920 Obv 31920 Obv 4
  2 obverses
1921
1921 Rev D1921 Rev E
2 new Rev, 1 new Obv
 5 possible types
1922
1922

1923
1923

1924
1924

1925
1925

1926
1926 First Effigy1926 Modified Effigy
2 obverses
1927
1927 Old type1927 New type
2 Reverses
1928
1928

1929
1929

1930
1930

1931
1931

1932
1932

1933
1933

1934
1934

1935
1935

1936
1936


1911

There are two different Hollow Neck Obverses for 1911 shillings, and one Flat Neck, but only a single reverse.
Obverse 3 is the scarcest of the three types.



1911 1+A
Obverse 1

1911 1+A


1911 2+A
Obverse 2

1911 2+A


1911 3+A
Obverse 3

1911 3+A

1912

A new reverse is introduced this year.

Reverse A, distinguishable by the narrow IMP, is much scarcer than its commoner rev B counterpart

Reverse A - Narrow IMP

1912 3+A


1912 3+A
Reverse B - letters in I M P are more widely spaced

1912 3+B


1912 3+B

1913

All the silver from 1913 is trickier than you might expect.

3+B

+1913 1913

1914

3+B

1914 1914

1915

3+B

1915 1915

1916

3+B

1916 1916

1917

3+B

1917 1917

1918

3+B

1918 1918

1919

3+C

A very minor realignment of the D of IND gives the 1919 shilling a single year reverse.  Intriguingly, Reverse B was re-adopted the following year.

1919 1919

1920

Reverse B, but a new obverse is introduced, so two types of 1920 shilling:

Obverse 3 Obverse 4
I of GEORGIVS points between beads
Small Head is in high relief
Flat neck
Wide rim
I of GEORGIVS points at a bead
Large Head is in low relief
Slightly hollow neck
Narrow rim

The composition of all the silver coins was debased in 1920 from 92.5% sterling silver to 50% silver.  Initially the alloy used was Ag 50%, Cu 40%, Ni 10%, but this was not found to be satisfactory.  Ag 50%, Cu 50% was tried briefly and found to be even worse, and finally Ag 50%, Cu 40%, Ni 5%, Zn 5% was settled on.  This alloy saw the coinage through to the final removal of silver in 1946.

All 1920 shillings, and all the following dates, are 50% silver.



1920 3+B
Obverse 3 - commoner

1920 3+B


1920 4+B
Obverse 4 - scarcer

1920 4+B

1921

Things get a little complex in 1921.  Reverse B is not used again, but two new reverses are introduced, D and E, and along with Obverses 3 and 4, there is a new Obverse 5.  Thus, we have 5 potential combinations for 1921:

The distribution of scarcity across these 5 types suggests that types 4+E and 5+D are probably mules.

Rev D

Tail tuft points between the I and M of IMP

1921 4+D
Obv 4

I of GEORGIVS points between beads

1921 4+D
Rev E

Tail tuft points at the left leg of the M of IMP

1921 5+E
Obv 5

I of GEORGIVS points at a bead

1921 5+E

1922

5+E

1922 1922

1923

5+E

Quite easy up to EF, but true UNCs are ever so tricky.

1923 1923

1924

5+E

Quite easy up to EF, but true UNCs are ever so tricky.

1924 1924

1925

5+F

This is the primary condition rarity of the series - N (neither scarce nor common) in grades below VF, S (Scarce) in VF, R (Rare) in EF, and R2 (Very rare) in As Struck condition.

1925 1925

1926



1926 First Effigy
Obverse 5, First Effigy

1926 First Effigy


1926 Modified Effigy
Obverse 6, Modified Effigy

1926 Modified Effigy

1927

6+F

1927 Shilling ME 1927 Shilling ME
1927 Shilling new type 1927 Shilling new type

A comprehensive redesign of the coinage took place in 1927. The two types issued with this date are of similar abundance.


1928

1+A

1928 1928

1929

1+A

1929 1929

1930

1+A

This is another genuine condition rarity - N (neither scarce nor common) in grades below VF, S (Scarce) in VF, R (Rare) in EF, and R2 (Very rare) in As Struck condition.

1930 1930

1931

1+A

1931 1931

1932

1+A

1932 1932

1933

1+A

1933 1933

1934

1+B

1934 1934

1935

1+C

1935 1935

1936

1+D

1936 1936